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Maine College Mentoring Project

Summary:

Putting research into action, seven colleges and universities in Maine worked under a grant from the U.S. Department of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention to develop the College Community Mentoring Project. Learn more about the guide to replicate the this program. 

Topics Covered:

  • Role Models
  • Student-Teacher Relations
  • Mentoring
  • Informal Mentoring
  • Engagement

Premium Content:

Mentoring school-aged children is one of the most effective strategies for fostering their academic and social success. When all our living presidents formed the America’s Promise Alliance year formed in 1997, mentoring was included in one of the Five Promises, fundamental resources we owe our children. Incorporated into relationships with caring adults, mentoring children has become a commonly accepted program practice for communities throughout the country.

Putting research into action, seven colleges and universities in Maine worked under a grant from the U.S. Department of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention to develop the College Community Mentoring Project. Since 1997, college students in Maine have mentored hundreds of elementary and middle school children in communities across the state. Along with benefits for those school-aged children, many college students report finding a renewed sense of purpose through their volunteer efforts and more than a few also found career pathways, made important connections in the community, and learned valuable skills.

The Maine College Community Mentoring Project produced a detailed guide that any college could use to replicate the program. It offers a practical overview of how to set up the program including partnering with local schools, mentor recruitment and development, program implementation, and evaluation ideas, all tied to evidence-based materials (checklists, work sheets, tip sheets, and forms), and includes valuable lessons learned by the participating colleges and universities.

Interested in learning more about this valuable resource? Contact Deborah Fisher at deborah1701@fishernyberg.com.